Home | Experience Design

Eight Golden Rules of Interface Design

Alex Christie

6 May 2008
Ben Shneiderman in Designing the User Interface proposed the following principles for good interaction design.



1 Strive for consistency
Consistent sequences of actions should be required in similar situations; 
identical terminology should be used in prompts, menus, and help screens; and consistent commands should be employed throughout.

 

2 Enable frequent users to use short cuts.
As the frequency of use increases, so do the user’s desires to reduce the number of interactions and to increase the pace of interaction. Abbreviations, function keys, hidden commands, and macro facilities are very helpful to an expert user.

3 Offer informative feedback.
For every operator action, there should be some system feedback. For frequent and minor actions, the response can be modest, while for infrequent and major actions, the response should be more substantial.

4 Design dialogue to yield closure.
Sequences of actions should be organized into groups with a beginning, middle, and end. The informative feedback at the completion of a group of actions gives
  the operators the satisfaction of accomplishment, a sense of relief, the signal
  to drop contingency plans and options from their minds, and an indication that the way is clear to prepare for the next group of actions.

5 Offer simple error handling.
As much as possible, design the system so the user cannot make a serious error. If an error is made, the system should be able to detect the error and offer simple, comprehensible mechanisms for handling the error.

6 Permit easy reversal of actions.
This feature relieves anxiety, since the user knows that errors can be undone; 
it thus encourages exploration of unfamiliar options. The units of reversibility may be a single action, a data entry, or a complete group of actions.

7 Support internal locus of control.
Experienced operators strongly desire the sense that they are in charge of the
  system and that the system responds to their actions. Design the system to make
  users the initiators of actions rather than the responders.

8 Reduce short-term memory load.
The limitation of human information processing in short-term memory requires that displays be kept simple, multiple page displays be consolidated, window-motion frequency be reduced, and sufficient training time be allotted for codes, mnemonics, and sequences of actions.


From http://faculty.washington.edu/jtenenbg/courses/360/f04/sessions/schneidermanGoldenRules.html 

LEAVE A COMMENT

IF YOU LIKED THIS POST, YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE THESE:

Google Analytics Old Interface Switching Off

Google Analytics Old Interface Switching Off - Soon, Maybe! As it says in the title for those of you...

Elegant visualisations of LastFM data

This might a story for the technology blog, it could also fit on the experience design blog, if I was...

Watch out Google here comes Wiki…

Wikipedia founder, Jimmy Wales hopes that the project he personally heads called Wiki Search, will end...

Yahoo in the News

Yahoo has tweaked their search algorithm so that it displays relevant news on any given search, the new...

What is Conversion Design?

Conversion design or conversion focused design is the collaboration of several different disciplines...

Grab This Widget